dilemma!! Dance Me.. - for a bridal waltz?

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MonkOverBook
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Post by MonkOverBook » Mon Apr 10, 2006 5:52 pm

lightning wrote:Some people would see the similarities between marriage and a concentration camp so it would be a good wedding song all around!
Well, lightning, even considering my own past, I am a bit reluctant to accept this simile. Dachau CC is some 10 km from my place, and one can hardly imagine the perfection of the terror machinery which is still in the air over there.

Yet again, I wonder why Folsom Prison Blues was one of my favourites during the last years... :|
Das Wort ist bloß ein Anfang,
bis es auf das Ohr trifft, das es auf-fängt,
und auf den Mund, der ihm ant-wortet.
- Franz Rosenzweig
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Davido
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Post by Davido » Mon Apr 10, 2006 7:18 pm

Nogs, of course the final decision as to whether to use 'Dance Me...' for your wedding must be yours, based on what YOU FEEL. But if it is of any help to you in reaching a decision, Leonard was asked about the meaning and origin of this song in an interview for Australian TV in 1985.
Leonard said that his initial idea was to write a song about Berlin and the origins/roots of evil. (He had learnt that in the concentration camps they forced string quartets to play while the killing of 'inmates' took place).
However, as the songwriting process progressed,these ideas and verses he had constructed would not fit in and he realised that he was actually writing a 'love song or wedding song'.He went on to say that it became 'a prayer or a love song'. 'If the song comes from a deep place' he said,'it will have a wide embrace'.
I will be more than happy to send you a copy of the song and interview on DVD as a wedding present, and whatever your decision, I wish you a happy and healthy life together.
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lightning
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Post by lightning » Mon Apr 10, 2006 10:13 pm

50% of marriages end in divorce. If people did not have so many romantic illusions to start out with, the disillusionment would not be so great. Remember that even the author of this very romantic wedding song wound up, in the field of marriage, a beautiful loser.
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MonkOverBook
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Post by MonkOverBook » Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:20 pm

lightning wrote:If people did not have so many romantic illusions to start out with, the disillusionment would not be so great.
That indeed, lightning, is the point. Romanticism has spoiled (and still does) the hardships and pleasures of ordinary every day life. We do expect too much from a relationship, and most of all, we often expect others to fill the holes we'd first have to fill ourselves. Nobody should get married who seems to "need" a partner -- we'll only be able to make somebody else happy if we're independent enough to be happy on our own. That is, at least, what I have experienced myself.
Das Wort ist bloß ein Anfang,
bis es auf das Ohr trifft, das es auf-fängt,
und auf den Mund, der ihm ant-wortet.
- Franz Rosenzweig
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lightning
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Post by lightning » Tue Apr 11, 2006 3:21 am

If there were a food or drug that failed more than 50% of the time and caused terrible pain and suffering when it did, ( and sometimes when it didn't)it would be outlawed, right? So why not a cultural institution?
"There ain't no cure for love?" But there is: often, it's marriage.
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MonkOverBook
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Post by MonkOverBook » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:06 pm

lightning wrote:"There ain't no cure for love?" But there is: often, it's marriage.
It's hard to admit, but you are quite right, lightning...
Das Wort ist bloß ein Anfang,
bis es auf das Ohr trifft, das es auf-fängt,
und auf den Mund, der ihm ant-wortet.
- Franz Rosenzweig
Cosmoline
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Post by Cosmoline » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:17 pm

Well it's a better choice than the one I had--"Everybody Knows" :lol:
Baldwyn
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Post by Baldwyn » Tue Apr 18, 2006 3:47 am

If I can find a woman who'll let me use Don't Go Home with Your Hard On at our wedding, then once I have her, she'll always be there.

(I say use it.)
nogs
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Post by nogs » Thu Apr 20, 2006 7:56 am

ha ha baldwyn, you are funny :)

i just want to say thanks to davido, what a star! I had been told about the interview with Leonard Cohen (which was what freaked me out in the first place!) but no-one mentioned that he went on to say he ultimately felt the song was a prayer or love song.

thank you so much, i now feel completely happy with our decision to use the song. Now its time to enrol in some dance lessons so we can do it justice :) Our wedding is in June, i will let you all know how the dance goes down!
Bob Dawson
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Post by Bob Dawson » Thu Apr 20, 2006 11:28 pm

I know a French-Canadian couple who made it part of their wedding many years ago, in a small town far from the big city. The bride loved the song; the groom, and most of the audience, spoke little English, and had never heard the song before, and had never heard of Leonard Cohen. It was basically a farm town. Well, most of them became devout fans of the singer and the song from that moment onward.
And when the first baby celebration came along, it was the same song: "Dance me to the children who are asking to be born...."
So you have this little French-Canadian Catholic farm village where lots of people can't speak English, but can sing along with that song, and even recite entire verses.
And, as an aside, Sartre and other existentialists moaned that "I did not ask to be born." Poor me, I was thrown into the universe. One line in the song overthrows a generation of that anti-life depression:
"Dance me to the children who are asking to be born..."
The creators of beauty are the true revolutionaries
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Thu Apr 20, 2006 11:57 pm

Your description of these lovely and inspiring scenarios :D should be encouraging to Nogs, Bob 8) . In addition to Leonard's own comments, what great anecdotal evidence of this being a perfect choice :D !!

~ Lizzy
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lightning
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Post by lightning » Fri Apr 21, 2006 6:14 am

Where are those children asking to be born except in a poet's imagination?
Bob Dawson
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Post by Bob Dawson » Fri Apr 21, 2006 1:34 pm

It is after they are born, and, for example, you see the mother with her child, or the children playing on the beach, and you say, behold the children who asked to be born. You don't have to take it as anything more than a compliment to the mother, if you don't want to get all mystical about it. But you see a mother and child, and sometimes you know that you or anybody else, would have asked to be born, to have a mother such as that. To play on a beach such as that. To play with other children such as those who are playing over there, in the meadow, with no toys other than their imaginations.
It is true that there is no voting booth where Jean-Paul Sartre asked to never be born, and his request was rejected and he got thrown into the universe against his will. And the way he treated Simone deBeauvoir, well, she should have killed him and fulfilled his request retroactively.
And so there is no voting booth where the children ask to be born. But retroactively, there is. When a man and a woman, in love, dance towards the children who are asking to be born.
The creators of beauty are the true revolutionaries
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lightning
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Post by lightning » Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:19 pm

Good poetry is credible : true as well as beautiful. Bad poetry is mere fantasy.
The reincarnationists say we create our births by karma from a past life. That is, we get what we deserve and need to proceed towards perfection (no more births and deaths). I don't know if that is true but it seems like a good mystical explantion of how we "ask" to be born.
Sherry
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Post by Sherry » Wed Apr 26, 2006 8:16 pm

Bob Dawson wrote:I know a French-Canadian couple who made it part of their wedding many years ago, in a small town far from the big city. "
I loved this anecdote. It never ceases to amaze me where Leonard Cohen's music turns up. Recently, a friend came back from a visit to see her family in South Africa and told me that their next-door-neighbour had had a birthday party and she could hear Leonard Cohen's music blaring all night long!

Sherry
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