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Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 9:41 pm
by Christine
I'm also happy it worked out, Baldwyn. It's interesting that Leonard thought he'd been nominated for the R&R Hall of Fame before. On Sunday I was at a Jackson Browne concert for the Ojai Raptor Center and Perla sang one song.... Bird on a Wire, what else? Sounds like it's one of her favorites as at her UCLA show she told a story that she felt like she owned this song and a friend told her that no, the song actually owned her. Anyway, Perla sang it absolutely perfectly and the audience was spellbound. That she got a pretty rowdy standing ovation didn't come as a surprise. Prior to singing, she dedicated the song to Leo and mentioned that she'd sent him an email congratulating him on his nomination, to which he replied, "Darling, I've been nominated before."

I'm not sure if there are any So Cal folks in and around the board. But on October 20, it's Ojai Day and I hear Perla will be singing 10 songs. Her set begins at 3pm, I believe, but don't take my word for it. It's free and the concert is being held at the Libbey Bowl. Set amidst very old, mature trees in a small park with a capacity of only 1600, it's a great place to hear her sing.

Have a terrific time tonight, Baldwyn.

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 9:49 pm
by lizzytysh
You're privy to TONS of great stuff where you live, Christine. I'm sure you count your blessings. I wouldn't miss that 10-song concert by Perla, in that setting, for love nor money, if I lived anywhere near. Lucky you seeing her at the Raptor fundraiser. It seems with the purpose of the Raptor center being rehab, her singing of the line "I have tried in my way to be free" would have been especially moving. I found the lovely book about the Golden Eagle... how are you at returning books? I'll PM you on it.


~ Lizzy

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:03 pm
by Yankovic
Baldwyn wrote: There was talk about the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, and Leonard had thought he'd been nominated before, and wondered where the hall was. Alan Acosta noted that he was in the Canadian equivalent, which Leonard said "Yes, but it isn't called that, it's called the Vestibule of Fame."

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:52 pm
by Baldwyn
The questions I quoted were all from the host, but they did take audience questions (written down on index cards). I'll report back tomorrow!

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 12:15 am
by dick
Great news

Thanks Baldwyn. We're happy for you!

Be sure to review the performance as well.

Dick

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 1:14 am
by dar
"I think I will." O yes! I am so glad to hear that LC is responding to the tour questions in the affirmative.
That is one concert I will attend even if obstacles are in my way. No way I'd miss out on a chance to see him perform live. I've never seen him perform and I am so so happy to hear he may!

Thanks for that info Baldwyn. Yay!!

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 2:52 am
by blonde madonna
Glad you made it Baldwyn.
Jorden has posted some video already on another thread.
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=9489&hilit=

Hey Christine sounds like you have been having some fun too. It's years since I saw Jackson Browne. Btw don't you think raptor is a horrible name for such a beautiful bird?
Image

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 3:54 am
by KjeXXXer
I am pleased beyond belief.

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 4:00 am
by Idysseus
You can see two small snippets of video from Leonard and Philip Glass here: http://enlightenmentdotcom.zaadz.com/bl ... ohens_talk

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 8:27 am
by Idysseus
Just got back from the show at Stanford tonight.

I thought it rocked. A 10 out of 10.

The instrumentation was fantastic, especially the several driving strings. Those strings are still in my head...a true gestalt, with fabulous singing and choreography and fixed and projected graphics.

And Leonard was there at the end, and came on stage and took a bow to an already standing ovation of near 2,000 people. Kudos to Philip Glass and his entire team.

I'm very, very glad I made the effort to see Philip Glass's rendition of Book of Longing.

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 12:30 pm
by lizzytysh
WoW :D !! This is GREAT NEWS, Idysseus 8) !!! Thanks for letting us know and so quickly :) !!


~ Lizzy

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 2:13 pm
by Anne
There is a nice picture with this article.

http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2 ... 01007.html

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 3:39 pm
by dar
I've watched the video several times just to be sure I'm not imagining it. He will tour! Here I thought those of us gathered around Jarkko's page were keeping the faith and were few and far between. O, hell, no. This tour is going to be well attended and maybe sell-out venues fast. Hope we'll get advance info on the tour schedule, etc. so we can plan our trips.
Well, at least I'll need to save up for this. Can't wait for that "tour info" thread to start!

Thanks again Idysseus.

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 8:46 pm
by Baldwyn
Hrm. I didn't come away feeling like I enjoyed the show. I really enjoyed the solos, and listening to the recordings of Leonard reading his poems. I also liked the presentation of the drawings, and thought that aspect worked well. But for the singing parts, I found the words very difficult to follow, and the music to be unmelodic, or random sounding. I found that experience took away from the poems. Leonard's work is often conversational, and his music speaks to us, rather than sings to us. His sparseness of delivery leaves much to the listener to infer, making the experience very interactive. Having this changed, and the poems delivered in such a manner removed much of my interaction. The amusing poems, when performed, left me with the feeling that Philip Glass just can't tell the joke. A Thousand Kisses Deep was interesting from the aspect that it was reinvented to new music. But I was a bit shocked to hear that wonderful turn of phrase "invincible defeat" so deflated.

Just my opinion, I'm glad others enjoyed it. It's a neat project, like someone coming to you with this great book, and excitedly shows it to you, reading selections from it. And the Book of Longing is so much a portrait of Leonard. But now, instead of learning about the man through him, it's Philip saying "Lemme tell you about this guy." Intimacy is lost.

Re: Leonard in Stanford with Philip Glass

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2007 9:39 pm
by lizzytysh
Hi Baldwyn ~

I feel pretty much exactly as you, but have stayed pretty silent... inferring it only. I'm glad to see you say it... and I have to support you in your perception. I was hoping that with more shows, it might improve, as Glass assured that shows do [become more cohesive and through that, rise to a higher level] in their first Conversation. However, Glass's work is simply not to my taste... or at least not with this production as a representation. I can tell by reading your synopsis that the number of performances between my seeing it and now would not have made a difference in that; though, perhaps, being a classically-trained musician or singer would. With that, I would be able to appreciate their skill and technique.

I was also hoping that my vantage point ['third floor'-balcony] might have impacted my feelings about it... as I was distanced from the performers... and the speakers were aimed straight at me, so Leonard's voice was muffled at times; plus, the audience clapped through one my most favourite poems which he read. I didn't feel connected, at all, to the performance. For me, it was pretty much sterile, in terms of how I feel about Leonard's music and voice... both being anything but; with sterility and precision not being the same.

I had heard a brief portion of one of Glass's songs on NPR for something altogether different, a segment on him and two other contemporary composers; it seemed rather melodic and full, so I was really looking forward to this. However, in this, it all felt more discordant/"random" than anything else. I don't know if "avant garde" would fit, as I like avant garde, but there's generally more I can relate to with it. I kept waiting for a melody that was accessible and that I could resonate with and remember. One never appeared, though... at least not for me.

When I had read that the performance involved movement onstage, I imagined the interpretive kind of movement to the songs [such as the Finnish one, which I know I would have very much enjoyed... and similar to the "Sincerely L. Cohen" one we saw in NYC and that I enjoyed, where movement was everywhere, directly related to the songs]. I didn't expect the movement to simply be the singers and musicians moving into and out of position for where and how they would perform the songs... different locations on the stage and in different combinations. I imagined prop boards of Leonard's art being moved around the stage, as well, relevant to whatever was being sung. I expected melodies and a depth of emotional expression that I simply didn't find, at least enough for my taste, in Glass's. I was fascinated by how far 'afield' Leonard's work had been taken, but I wasn't moved or inspired by any of the performances. In New York City, I enjoyed Dominique's singing, but in Glass's performance, she seemed fenced in by his arrangements.

Hearing Leonard recite his own poems with the depth and timbre I'm used to with him; seeing his art projected onstage and reading the writing alongside some of the pieces; and the Conversation that followed were worth the price of the ticket for me. It seems so for you, as well. Having the opportunity for those things and seeing Leonard's artwork in person at the Drabinsky Gallery were worth the time and all the associated costs of going to Toronto. If I had the opportunity, I thought I would see the performance, again, in hopes that it was only my vantage point and initial impressions, and that seeing it later in its run might make it all better for me. However, reading your comments, I see that it affected you pretty much the same as it did me, and that my feelings wouldn't be likely to change.

Thanks for your comments, Baldwyn. I'm glad whenever I see someone laud the performance, as I feel there are Glass fans who will become acquainted with Leonard through this production. I've been paying particular attention to what Leonard fans have thought of it.


~ Lizzy