Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

News about Leonard Cohen and his work, press, radio & TV programs etc.
Eileen ODowd
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat May 03, 2008 2:28 am

"Bird on a Wire" - new DVD

Post by Eileen ODowd » Thu Sep 09, 2010 3:06 am

:razz: Yesterday I received my ordered copy of "Bird on a Wire" from Amazon. I must say that it is excellent. Watched it last night (Tuesday)
It comprised filming from the 1972 European Tour and showed a much more vulnerable Leonard. Even at that stage, nearly forty years ago it was obvious that he was strongly and devotedly admired. :D Recommended viewing. Already recommended to all friends ;-)
User avatar
sirius
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 4:09 am
Location: Manchester

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by sirius » Thu Sep 09, 2010 4:37 pm

DVD Review: ‘Bird on a Wire’ — The long lost 1972 Leonard Cohen documentary finally gets its release

a film that is literally like discovering a buried treasure. Any fan of the folk legend, or of rock documentaries in general has got to pick this DVD up immediately… It’s an owner.

Posted by The Zeitgeisty Report (c)

Sep 9th, 2010

RATING *****

Image


Once thought lost forever, this documentary of Cohen’s arduous 1972 European tour (From Dublin to Jerusalem), directed by Tony Palmer, closely mirrors the internationally acclaimed DA Pennebaker Bob Dylan doc “Don’t Look Back”.

Like the more famous film, it chronicles behind-the-scene goings on intercut with live performances. However, what the footage exposes is a more truthful affair, in that it shines a brighter light on the artist, revealing him to be far more sensitive, articulate, and uncompromising than the playful and elusively inscrutable young Dylan, which only makes sense as Cohen was nearly 40 at the time.

One scene that perfectly sums up the rock poet’s worldview, is when a reporter asks him what the “meaning of life is”… He pauses briefly and answers wearily, “Survival.”

Yes.

This movie is, in effect, about the survival of his band (a star studded entourage that includes back up singer Jennifer Warnes and renowned record producer Bob Johnston) as they navigate technical difficulties, unruly crowds and the emotional drain of a tour that is not running smoothly.

Capturing everything from Cohen trying to pick up a beautiful groupie only to coolly let it go, to his tearful breakdown on the final night because he felt that they were not delivering the songs well enough for the audience (he was crazy, by the way) this is one of the most candid snapshots of an artist at his peak that I’ve ever seen. Add to that truly stunning performances of some of his most beloved classics (Suzanne, Sisters of Mercy, Famous Blue Raincoat and So Long Marianne) and you have a film that is literally like discovering a buried treasure.

Any fan of the folk legend, or of rock documentaries in general has got to pick this DVD up immediately… It’s an owner.

http://www.zeitgeistyreport.com/article ... s-release/
We are so small between the stars, so large against the sky
User avatar
lightning
Posts: 1353
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2002 4:54 am
Location: New York City
Contact:

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by lightning » Thu Sep 09, 2010 4:53 pm

Didn't he say the definition of success was survival? And didn't the girl try to pick him up and get turned down politely? Oh well, good review anyway.
User avatar
TineDoes
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 2:48 pm
Location: Holland

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by TineDoes » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:11 pm

lightning wrote:Didn't he say the definition of success was survival?
You are quite right. An Artist at his peak? A peak!
Just now finished watching Bird on a Wire for the first time. It has blown me away. My tears really started flowing when Jennifer embraced the other backing singer who broke down after this emotional last concert. Was very shaken by seeing all the images during the Story of Isaac. A wonderfully made and very true and revealing document of Leonard, the tour and the time set.
"There’s no forsaking what you love ...."

Rotterdam 2008; Antwerpen, Dublin 2009; Gent 2x, Lille , Las Vegas 2x 2010, Gent, Amsterdam, Dublin 2x 2012, Antwerp, Berlin, Rotterdam 2013
User avatar
sirius
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 4:09 am
Location: Manchester

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by sirius » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:22 pm

Rediscovering Leonard

Tony Palmer’s classic Cohen documentary concert film rediscovered after nearly 40 years.

Published September 9, 2010 by Alistair Henning in Screen Feature

http://www.seemagazine.com/article/scre ... nard-4622/

Image

Bird On A Wire is veteran documentarian Tony Palmer’s film about Leonard Cohen’s 1972 European Tour. Having gone missing soon after completion, the film which is only now receiving its first official release almost 40 years later.

Palmer was asked to make the film by Marty Machat, Cohen’s long-time manager right up until his death in 1988. Recently, Palmer shared how the film came to be.
“Machat, who’s since died of cancer, had two problems. The first problem was that Leonard didn’t enjoy touring and wasn’t going to do it any more. The second problem, which he didn’t tell me until some while later, was that his record company was threatening to dump him because the first three LPs had sold pretty badly. They’d sold reasonably well in Europe, but in the States had sold very badly.

“So Machat was faced with the problem that if he didn’t get something filmed, it was possible there would be no visual document on record of this extraordinary man. So that’s why the film got made.

“I always wondered why, during the film making, I never ever saw a record executive. In retrospect, I can see why: it’s because they weren’t interested in him!”
A difficult artist, Cohen was initially wary of filming. Palmer explains, “When I first met Leonard in October 1971, he laid down various conditions. Firstly, that I included him reading his poems. Another was that I not convey the impression he was simply a whimsical poet of love songs. And thirdly, that I never lost sight of the fact that the songs had a very hard political edge. Some of the songs more than others, but they certainly were intended as political statements about the human condition.

“It’s to Leonard’s credit that he never prevented us from doing anything. There’s a scene at the end, in the dressing room in Jerusalem, when he’s completely collapsed and he’s in tears. We were two feet away from him, and none of what you see in the film, especially not that sequence, was done for our benefit. He wasn’t playing up to the camera, that was really what he felt, and he just ignored us.

“Once, I made a film about Maria Callas. In a way it’s an interesting parallel, because my film about Callas is about a woman who’s in a hell of a mess, who also happened to be a great opera singer. Rather than film about a great opera singer, who’s also a woman in a hell of a mess. There’s a very important balance there.

“The version on the DVD is about 95 per cent of what it was originally. But even before Leonard saw it, it was shown to the BBC because the film I’d made of the farewell concert of Cream was made for them. The BBC immediately bought it, and offered money for it. If that had been accepted, Machat would have gotten back three quarters of what he’d invested, immediately. Alas, Cohen told me he thought the film was ‘too confrontational,’ and worried that he often appeared ‘exhausted, even wasted’.”

Nine months and hundreds of thousands of dollars later, a second version of the film was ready. Parker “was told it was shown to the BBC, who turned it down flat saying ‘it was a mess.’ ”

Palmer now has a copy of their letter. Apparently, Machat also had refused to pay for the re-editing, thinking that this was now Cohen’s responsibility.
Version 2 had a brief theatrical outing and was shown for one night only at the Rainbow Theatre in north London, July 5, 1974, almost two years after Parker delivered the original version.

Palmer says he not invited to see the revised version: “I was not at the Rainbow, and only saw it for the first time six months ago. Had I seen it then, I would have insisted my name be removed, because although it contains about 50 per cent of my original film, the structure has been destroyed, the musical editing is crass beyond belief, and the whole purpose of the film had been lost. When I read that Cohen would only promote the film “through gritted teeth,” I think I can understand why.”

After that, film disappeared. Palmer had never kept a copy of the original version. And, in every biography of Cohen that appeared conflicting and misleading information appeared about the film.

Then, in 2009, 294 rolls of film were discovered in a warehouse in Hollywood. Palmer tells the story: “There were various ups and downs over the past year. An ‘up’ was when we thought we’d found the material, and it was shipped by London by of all people Frank Zappa’s manager (who’s sadly since died). A ‘down’ was when I got the stuff and I realized it was all the original rushes, the dailies. Many were in rusted up cans that sometimes had to be hammered open. There was no way I was going to reconstruct the film from that. I believed that nothing could be salvaged. The cans did not contain the negative (which is still lost); some of the prints were in black and white; and much of it had been cut to pieces and/or scratched beyond use.

“The next ‘up’ was a rainy day in London; I thought I’d organize the boxes, and quite by chance I knocked the lid off one of the boxes and inside were the original dubbing tracks [soundtracks, for the mixing of the sound]. I knew they were original because they were accompanied by the dubbing charts, which were in my handwriting. So all of a sudden we had a soundtrack, but absolutely no pictures. I then began to systematically go through about 294 cans of rushes. It was like a gigantic jigsaw puzzle. We’d find one bit of picture and I’d remember it, think ‘that goes there’ and I’d cut it out from the rushes. We’d send it off to the laboratory to be cleaned and restored, and stored digitally. The film you just saw is made up of around 3,000 little bits of film that were put together in that way. Part of me feels ‘my God, we actually did it!’”

According to Palmer, “Leonard has communicated that he was very relieved that the film has finally appeared. Machat’s son, who helped us, told me, that Leonard felt in a strange kind of way he’d let me down, that the film that I’d made had somehow gone and been replaced with a film which he hated.”

Palmer recalls, “About six months after the premiere of the second version, Machat called me up and quietly asked me how difficult it would be to reconstruct the original version. So I remember saying, this was shot on celluloid. The moment you cut the negative, there’s not much you can do. And even now, when we reconstructed the film you’ve seen, we never had found the negative. What you see on the DVD is all positive film, polished, cleaned as best we can.”

For Parker, working on this documentary “has been very special. Because this was a film that was effectively lost, and now we’ve found it.

But it was worth it, says Palmer, to recall and restore his original purposes in making the film: “Yes, the songs are haunting, unforgettably so. The poetry, now restored having been deleted in Version 2 by persons unknown, is extraordinary. But so is the man. Cohen objected in the original film to scenes of a riot in Tel Aviv. I wanted the scenes because they showed Cohen’s power over an audience, not by him shouting, but simply by his presence. Authority doesn’t really describe it; transparent goodness is probably closer. And a profound belief that it is the poet’s responsibility to address the problems of the world, the political problems.
“That belief, tough and uncompromising though it is, is the centre of my film.”
Last edited by sirius on Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:31 pm, edited 2 times in total.
We are so small between the stars, so large against the sky
User avatar
sirius
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 4:09 am
Location: Manchester

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by sirius » Thu Sep 09, 2010 7:27 pm

‘Bird on a Wire’ celebrates singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen

By ROBERT W. BUTLER

The Kansas City Star


http://www.kansascity.com/2010/09/08/22 ... riter.html


I’ve long been aware of singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen — what child of the ’60s hasn’t tried to woo a member of the opposite sex to the beautiful strains of “Suzanne”?

But only in recent years have I become a genuine fan, thanks largely to “Leonard Cohen: I’m Your Man,” the 2006 concert film in which world-class artists performed the Canadian bard’s songs.

My admiration has been kicked up to full-fledged mania by the release on DVD of “Bird on a Wire,” a film about Cohen’s 1972 20-city European concert tour that was long thought lost.

“Bird” was shot for British television by Tony Palmer, who for 40 years has specialized in films — both features and documentaries — about musical subjects. He has covered everyone from the great classical composers to such pop icons as Frank Zappa (he helmed the main Mother’s 1971 misfire “200 Motels”).

Palmer described “Bird” as an “impression” of the Cohen tour, and that’s exactly how it plays. There’s no narration, no titles telling us what city we’re in. The film effortlessly zig-zags between concert footage, backstage gatherings and tour bus segments, with an occasional digression for a poetry reading by Cohen (who was a poet and novelist before he became a neo-folkie sensation in the mid-’60s). One delicious scene finds him trying to pick up a beautiful Swedish girl — but, irony of ironies, there are language problems.

There are moments of crisis — a public address system that conks out, an encounter with an overzealous security staff at a Jerusalem concert. (Cohen invites ticketholders in the balcony to come sit on the stage apron, and the orange-suited goons go ballistic.) But through it all, Cohen maintains a Zen-like equilibrium. In fact, aside from a gentle bemusement, he expresses no strong emotions. (Though by tour’s end, he’s reduced to tears — maybe it’s exhaustion.)

Unlike the classic cinema verite “Don’t Look Back” about Bob Dylan (remember when Cohen was described as the Canadian Dylan?), “Bird” has been shot and edited for maximum poetic effect, employing both black-and-white and color footage and different film stocks.

The performances (of now-classics such as “Suzanne,” “Sisters of Mercy,” “Who By Fire,” “Story of Isaac,” “Chelsea Hotel,” “Famous Blue Raincoat” and the title tune) are superb, with Cohen’s deep voice (an acquired taste) perfectly augmented by a small, mostly acoustic band. Just beautiful.

The backstory is pretty great, too. Two years ago, Zappa’s former manager sent Palmer several boxes of film found in a Los Angeles warehouse. Among them was most of the “Bird on a Wire” footage, which Palmer painstakingly reassembled over two years, employing the latest digital technology to clean up both the soundtrack (the songs sound great) and the images.



Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2010/09/08/22 ... z0z3BEmWua
We are so small between the stars, so large against the sky
User avatar
sirius
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2008 4:09 am
Location: Manchester

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by sirius » Thu Sep 09, 2010 8:44 pm

Bird On a Wire: Leonard Cohen's 1972 European Tour

Image

03 September 2010 (Movie Review)

Words: Julian Douglas



http://entertainment.ie/Movie/feature/B ... /2/850.htm

Bird on a Wire is Tony Palmer's long forgotten and long lost 'fly on the wall' documentary of Leonard Cohen's 1972 European Tour. Starting in the salubrious surroundings of Dublin's National Stadium and ending in Jerusalem, the film interweaves live concert footage with backstage encounters. It follow a mostly bewildered band and management as they deal with exploding speakers, backstage groupies and the vagaries of an artist with an extremely delicate temperment. The performances are where this film really wins out. We are treated to beautiful versions of all the old favourites including Suzanne, Sisters of Mercy, Chelsea Hotel, So Long, Marianne and, of course, Bird on a Wire. Cohen comes across as an enigma but is this contrived or a very genuine artist finding extreme difficulty with success and stardom?


The name Kelley Lynch may not mean much to some Cohen fans. As his manager it was she who, in 2004, was caught with her fingers firmly in his pension fund cookie jar. She evidently did this to the tune of $5m which left Cohen virtually broke, bus pass in hand heading into his own personal 70s. She may well have done us all a favour. As he propelled himself back to work the world started to realise that this valuable artist was buried barely beneath the dust. In 2010 he is more popular than he ever was and at 75 years old, despite some questionable output over the years, still gives performances of such craft and artistry that his loyal following are simply left to drool. In his own prophetic words in 1972, "Success is survival".

Bird on a Wire gets in very close, sometimes uncomfortably close. Palmer got great access to Cohen both backstage and front of house, travelling and even into his shower. Throughout, Cohen is seen as a deep thinking artist and poet seemingly fighting several emotions - he doesn't want to be there - yet he seems to really enjoy the attention he receives. He talks of finding it hard to come to terms with writing an intimate song for one person and now being made to 'parrot' it out, night after night. "What would you like to talk about?", an eager journalist asks. "I'd like not to talk at all", he answers. It is important to remember that he is no 'spring chicken' at this stage - he is 37 years old.

Elegantly wasted would be the nicest way to describe him. His band constantly massaging his ego to encourage him to perform and his management trying to deal with the realities of touring in the 1970s as best they can. There are wonderful moments such as the band’s crew loading suitcases into the holds of commercial jets, Cohen giving his own money to disgruntled Germanic types backstage after a particularly frought performance and his ad libs and rambling during shows. Many genuinely hilarious moments are sprinkled through the nearly two hour film such as a sultry groupie coming on to Cohen backstage and him enjoying every moment of it. "Do you have a place?", he enquires. "I have many places", she responds. The final performance in Jerusalem decends into hilarious farce after what seems to be a questionable plan of taking mind-altering drugs before the performance begins.

The camerawork during the performances is understated, simple and beautiful and Palmer has the confidence in Cohen to leave the camera lingering for a long, long time.

If I have a quibble with this documentary it is that there is simply no structure. For a lukewarm fan this could get tedious. Given he focuses in on his Jewishness there could have been some kind of dynamic around the journey of the tour and the fact that it ends in Jerusalem. Seldom are we told where the filming is taking place and some songs are obviously made from several performances.

Ultimately though this film stands as a fascinating document of an important artist who over his exceedingly long career has written many beautiful and loved songs. He continues to delight audiences around the world and let's hope he has the power left to keep it up for a little while longer.



Bird On A Wire is available from Tower Recirds, Golden Discs, Laser, Celtic Note, IFI and online at classical.ie. RRP €19.99.
We are so small between the stars, so large against the sky
User avatar
mnkyface
Posts: 1979
Joined: Fri Dec 07, 2007 11:16 pm
Location: California

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by mnkyface » Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:37 am

lightning wrote:And didn't the girl try to pick him up and get turned down politely?
I've, erm, analyzed this scene at length, and I really think Leonard did not turn her down. She drops the ball, big time. He is receptive to her but there is a serious language gap and she is ultimately too concerned about her entourage. He says "I don't have any plans [for later]" and she thinks he is saying "place." He says "no, I don't have any place either- do you have a place for me?" Obviously he means a hotel room and she says "yes, a lot." At this point she could have stopped batting her eyes and giggling and dragged him out of there. They talk about a drink- and he says "but just YOU- I can't make it with all these people." Again she just giggles. He grows politely impatient with her at the end and sends her on her way, but there was definitely a window of opportunity that she let close for whatever reason. The mind boggles. :roll: :lol:

What's really interesting is the guy who comes along right after. I can't really hear him but I think he is saying something like "hey man she really wanted you", and is still trying to make it happen. He gets my vote for creepiest wingman.

Needless to say, I LOVED this documentary and absolutely feasted on every second of it. I got the last copy at my local Barnes and Noble (all were sold out online at Amazon and b&N when I checked) and I'm so thrilled. I laughed, and cried, and watched it all again. Two parts had me HOWLING with laughter- the guy with the tape recorder interview, and Leonard's "Ode to the Speaker." :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
John Etherington wrote: Another "quote" which I believe has been dropped from the movie was when Leonard is asked why he thinks people come to see him. He says words to the gist of "If I man stands in the street holding a sign with a message...any message...then a large crowd will soon gather round him. That's what I'm doing - holding up a sign...only it's a blank one, and people can project whatever they want onto it".
I was disapointed about this too, John. It's one of my favorite Leonard moments/quotes (I had only seen it on YouTube) and it should be part of this film.
"In this world of shallow, he is the abyss."~ YouTube commenter greg450318
________________________________________________________________
Lyon, July 2008 / Oakland x2, April 2009 / San Jose, November 2009 / Oakland, December 2010 / San Jose, November 2012 / Oakland, March 2013
User avatar
lightning
Posts: 1353
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2002 4:54 am
Location: New York City
Contact:

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by lightning » Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:57 am

Some day there will be a deluxe "Bird on the Wire" with a second disc featuring "deleted scenes", interviews with Tony Palmer, Leonard, Bob Johnston, and maybe some of the girls who couldn't bag him. It will be even more of a blockbuster than the current edition.
User avatar
Paul Zagreb
Posts: 459
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:51 pm
Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by Paul Zagreb » Fri Sep 10, 2010 1:31 am

I just watched it again. And what occurs to me is that the structure is just amazing. This is a drama in 3 acts - act 1 is the poet/musician at the peak of his powers, even if struggling to explain it to the journalists. Act 2 is the contradictions and doubts that come with the fame - singing the songs he wrote so long ago, for one person, now to a huge public, night after night (seems he is now reconciled to this!); worried about commercialism; and with a sound system that fails miserably. Act 3 is the denoument in Jerusalem which, as Leonard explains to the band is a special place to him (I experienced something like this once before in Montreal, he says, when all my sisters, and aunts and nieces were in the audience). And here the intensity becomes unbearable but - after shaving!!! - he manages to produce versions of Hey Thats No Way to Say Goodbye and So Long Marianne which are so powerful it is almost impossible not to cry with Leonard and the audience. I remain so glad we have this film, as it is now reconstructed, in the public domain.

Paul
2008: Manchester 20 June /Vienna 24 September /Berlin 4 October / Cardiff 8 November/Manchester 30 November 2009: Liverpool 14 July / Belgrade 2 September / Barcelona 21 September 2010: Zagreb 25 July /Sankt Margarethan 5 September 2012: Ghent 12 August/Verona 24 September/Lisbon 7 October 2013: London 21 June / Berlin 17 July / Ljubljana 25 July / Pula 2 August / London 15 September
John Etherington
Posts: 2594
Joined: Sat Sep 18, 2004 10:17 pm

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by John Etherington » Fri Sep 10, 2010 3:15 am

Hi mnkyface,

Thanks for confirming that the quote regarding the "man with a sign" that I referred to, was in the original "Bird on a Wire". I thought it was, but wasn't 100 per cent certain (it seems so long ago). The new version of the film is superb, but I do think that that the three omissions that I mentioned in my post (Tuesday) are puzzling.

I think the scene where Leonard negotiates the possible meeting with the girl has been expanded. It seems strange seeing these things analysed here in such detail...no-one seemed to do that with Leonard's stuff in the 70s. Then again there were only a handful of visible devotees. If my memory serves me well, there were plently of empty seats at the Rainbow Theatre premiere, and the other showings were at the tiniest cinemas imaginable, presumably tailored to the expected size of the audiences!

All the best, John E
User avatar
sturgess66
Posts: 4110
Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 2:50 pm
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by sturgess66 » Fri Sep 10, 2010 3:42 am

John Etherington wrote: Another "quote" which I believe has been dropped from the movie was when Leonard is asked why he thinks people come to see him. He says words to the gist of "If I man stands in the street holding a sign with a message...any message...then a large crowd will soon gather round him. That's what I'm doing - holding up a sign...only it's a blank one, and people can project whatever they want onto it".
Here it is - uploaded by "somewhat_nifty" a/k/a "messalina79" a/k/a Ruth. :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFqUFkdTPN4
Last edited by sturgess66 on Mon Sep 13, 2010 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
John Etherington
Posts: 2594
Joined: Sat Sep 18, 2004 10:17 pm

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by John Etherington » Fri Sep 10, 2010 11:42 am

Thanks, Sturgess. My memory wasn't too bad, considering that I've only seen it once in the last 35 years! I guess the clip was a bit rambling...though it could have been tightened up. The film quality wasn't so great though, so maybe thats why Tony Palmer decided to leave it out.
User avatar
B4real
Posts: 6731
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:49 am
Location: Q'ld, Australia

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by B4real » Fri Sep 10, 2010 2:01 pm

I have just received my copy today from leonardcohencafe. It arrived all the way to Australia safe and sound; thank you Vince, I will be buying more from you. :D

I have just finished watching it and I can't understand what the controversy over the content is all about! Yes, the scenes depicted while playing The Story Of Isaac are very, very confronting but that is how it was and much worse as well. I have seen three quarters of the content of this DVD before and I suspect so have a lot of others. As regards Leonard showing too much vunerability most of the scenes have been on public record for all to see for some time now. This has been one of the reasons that I have been drawn to him - his total honesty whether it be in good or bad circumstances. To tell it like it is. There are not many people in the public eye or anyone you may know personally who would have the guts to do that!

Tony Palmer has done a wonderful job in restoring and rescuing this old film and I thank him for it. I'm glad that I have his signed copy.

Bev
It doesn't have to be perfect, it just has to B4real ~ me
Attitude is a self-fulfilling prophecy ~ me ...... The magic of art is the truth of its lies ~ me ...... Only left-handers are in their right mind!
User avatar
musicmania
Posts: 1505
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 7:49 pm
Location: Kildare Town Ireland
Contact:

Re: Tony Palmer presents "Bird on a wire"

Post by musicmania » Fri Sep 10, 2010 2:05 pm

B4real wrote: This has been one of the reasons that I have been drawn to him - his total honesty whether it be in good or bad circumstances. To tell it like it is. There are not many people in the public eye or anyone you may know personally who would have the guts to do that!



Bev
Well said.
2009 Dublin 2010 Lissadell Katowice LV x2 2012 Ghent x2 Dublin x4 Montreal x2 Toronto x2 2013 New York x2 Brussels Dublin x2

Gwen's Leonard Cohen Journey: http://myleonardcohenjourney.wordpress.com/

"I did my best, it wasn't much"
Post Reply

Return to “News”