The New York Event in our memories

The New York Event - before and after!
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lizzytysh
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Postby lizzytysh » Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:15 pm

Hi Paula ~

Yes, I remember that 'mirroring' activity, though I'd forgotten the book "Manucian Man" and the loathesome act of signing out as John Lennon. I, too, was devastated by his death, his murder. I also suspect the FBI's involvement. I would be very interested in a copy of the article, Paula. I still have some magazines [boxed], which I bought at the time. [The same as I bought some for runaway Vesuvius.] I would really like to have a copy of an article written in John's homeland. I can re-send you my address, if you don't still have it. Thanks, if you don't mind doing this.

~ Lizzie
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Paula
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Postby Paula » Fri Aug 20, 2004 3:38 pm

It was The Manchurian Candidate. I thought I had spelt it wrong.

This is an interesting site about Chapman

http://www.guardian.co.uk/netnotes/ article

Sorry you have to put his name in the search box.
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lizzytysh
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Postby lizzytysh » Fri Aug 20, 2004 4:55 pm

:lol: No wonder I'd forgotten it.....rather forgettable, in that it never existed :wink: . Thanks for the link. I'll check it out later.
Anne
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Postby Anne » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:07 pm

There is a lyric in a Johnny Cash song that goes
"But please not one word of the man who had killed me.
Don't mention his name and his name will pass on."

I kind of feel that way about John Lennon's murderer. He may have wanted a sick type of celebrity. He doesn't deserve to be remembered. John is the one to remember.
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lizzytysh
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Postby lizzytysh » Fri Aug 20, 2004 5:34 pm

You're right, Anne. That's one thing that the U.S. does is give celebrity to the most vile. As I understand it, in Britain, they are closeted away ~ no books, no celebrity, no fame. So, if that's their motivator, they're thwarted right from the git-go.
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lizzytysh
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Postby lizzytysh » Fri Oct 13, 2006 4:33 pm

Now another, which I feel is no doubt for the sake of much higher rent, or whatever that is financially- vs. culturally-/historically-based thinking :( :
Punk venue CBGB's closing after 33 years By LARRY McSHANE, Associated Press Writer
Mon Oct 9, 2:56 PM ET



NEW YORK - Legs McNeil remembers the night back in 1975 when he walked into the dingy storefront club perched in the even dingier Bowery neighborhood. The band onstage, four guys in leather jackets and torn jeans, was the Ramones. McNeil sat at a nearby table, watching their set with Lou Reed.


It was unforgettable. But as McNeil would soon discover, it was just a typical night at CBGB's, the club that spawned punk rock while launching the careers of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Blondie, the Talking Heads and the Ramones.

"Every night was memorable, except I don't remember 'em," said a laughing McNeil, co-author of the punk rock history "Please Kill Me."

After Sunday, memories are all that will remain when the cramped club with its capacity of barely 300 people goes out of business after 33 years. Although its boom years are long gone, CBGB's remained a Manhattan music scene fixture: part museum, part barroom, home to more than a few rock and roll ghosts.

The club didn't exit without a fight. An assortment of high-profile backers, including E Street Band guitarist Little Steven Van Zandt, battled to keep the legendary club open. But in the end, it was a simple landlord-tenant dispute — and owner Hilly Kristal saw the handwriting on the club's dank walls.

"I knew the closing was inevitable, because my lawyers said, `You can't win this case. The law is that your lease is up, and they don't even need a reason to put you out,'" said Kristal.

Kristal sits beneath a platinum record from Joan Jett, a CBGB's clock and a few of the endless band stickers that blanket the interior. Kristal, who is battling lung cancer, wears a black and white CBGB's T-shirt with a matching baseball cap.

He once managed the Village Vanguard, the renowned jazz club where he booked acts like Miles Davis. Things were a bit different at his new club: "In rock, the bands were creative — but at first, they didn't play so well."

The first punk-scene band at Kristal's nightspot was Television, soon followed by Patti Smith. Punk poet Smith will play the closing night as well, a booking that Kristal described as effortless.

Smith isn't the only veteran playing one last gig. The '80s hardcore band Bad Brains and the '70s punks the Dictators are both scheduled for the final week. Blondie's Debbie Harry and Chris Stein are also stopping by.

When Kristal opened his doors in December 1973, CBGB's stood for country, bluegrass and blues — three musical styles that wound up in short supply. Tommy Ramone, drummer for the Ramones, recalled how a new breed of bands gravitated to the space.

"At that time, there were no places to play in New York," Ramone said last year. "It was a very dead time in New York City, doldrums all around. But CBGB's allowed bands — original bands, no less — the freedom to go and play and do whatever they pleased."

Kristal plans to move the club far from its roots with a new CBGB's in Las Vegas. The owner plans to strip the current club down to the bare walls, bringing as much of it to Nevada as possible.

"We're going to take the urinals," he said. "I'll take whatever I can. The movers said, `You ought to take everything, and auction off what you don't want on eBay.' Why not? Somebody will."

Even a longtime CBGB's devotee like McNeil thinks the best advice for the 74-year-Kristal is go west, old man.

"I always said Hilly should go to Vegas," said McNeil. "Girls with augmented breasts playing Joey Ramone slot machines. It would become an institution."
I hope that you, Lightning and Evelyn, and all you other New Yorkers and nearby-ers will be stopping by to see Patti Smith and the rest. I'm guessing you'll need to go early. The place will fill up fast and, unless there's some ordinance disallowing it, some listening will be forced to be from the sidewalk.

~ Lizzy
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dick
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Postby dick » Fri Oct 13, 2006 6:49 pm

Indeed another sad closing, and I now recall the panic the New York event organizing committee had when The Bottom Line closed -- with a sizable deposit of ours in their hands. Thank god we had a Philly Lawyer (Geoff) leading us -- he got it back somehow!
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lizzytysh
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Postby lizzytysh » Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:32 pm

a sizable deposit
Too bad it wasn't enough to make their rent [though it seems the same situation was prevailing there, too... with the lease end coupled with an exorbitant rent increase??]. Thank G~d for that Philly lawyer 8) so we could make the deposit for The Knitting Factory.

~ Lizzy
evelyn
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The New York Event in our Memories

Postby evelyn » Sat Oct 21, 2006 6:48 pm

Oct 15th the last show at CBGB's?

Oops! Missed it! I heard they are reopening in Las Vegas.

Last time I was there was for the LC Treasure Hunt.

Oh well...

evelyn

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